Karen DeWitt / WAMC

Nixon And Hawkins Hit Cuomo On Energy Policies

Two of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s political opponents were at an Earth Day rally on climate change attended by hundreds at the State Capitol, where they said the governor’s energy policies are far from adequate.

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Craig Ruttle / AP

LIPA Seeks Property Tax Reductions, But Customers Unlikely To See Savings

The Long Island Power Authority wants to reduce the property taxes it pays on four Long Island power plants. However, that doesn’t mean customers would see immediate savings on their energy bills.

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Edible Oddities: David Bowie-Inspired Menus Reflect His Many Personas

Matthew Yokobosky finds food inspirational — which is perhaps not entirely surprising, considering that as an art curator, it's his job to make connections between seemingly disparate objects, just as a chef creates a cohesive dish out of contrasting ingredients. So when New York City restaurateur and chef Saul Bolton suggested developing a themed menu and a series of dinners around the "David Bowie I s" exhibition now on view at the Brooklyn Museum, Yokobosky was intrigued. "I was knee-deep...

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The most expensive play in Broadway history opened Sunday night. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child cost $33.5 million, runs five and a half hours long (in two parts), and has gotten rave reviews. But while it has plenty of special effects, it's actually designed for audiences to use their imagination.

President Trump's tariffs on imported steel aren't the first time the industry has gotten protection from the U.S. government. Not by a long shot. In fact, tariff protection for the industry — which politicians often say is a vital national interest — goes back to the very beginning of the republic.

In his book, Clashing Over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy, Dartmouth professor Douglas Irwin writes that protection for the metal producers began in the 1790s.

Former President George H.W. Bush, whose wife, Barbara, died just last week, has been admitted to a Houston hospital for an infection that has spread to his blood.

"He is responding to treatments and appears to be recovering," Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath said in a statement. "We will issue additional updates as events warrant."

The killing of four people at a Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn., early Sunday morning is exposing the frequent breakdown among law enforcement agencies that regulate gun ownership.

A man who had his firearms license revoked in Illinois, after being arrested by the U.S. Secret Service at the White House last July, may have broken no laws by having guns — including an AR-15 — when he moved to Tennessee late last year.

The Fuzzy Future Of More Connecticut Casinos

Apr 23, 2018
Courtesy of Pixabay

With Connecticut’s legislative session wrapping up on May 9, it’s unclear which bills on gambling in the state will make it to the finish line before lawmakers hit the campaign trail.

Jessica Hill / AP

The Connecticut General Assembly is scheduled to hold hearings on Monday on the last set of judicial nominees submitted by outgoing Governor Dannel Malloy, but there might be a hiccup at the hearings.

A new exhibit that opens Monday at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum aims to honor a founding mission.

Five years in the making, "Americans and the Holocaust" contextualizes attitudes in the U.S. during 1930s and '40s persecution and mass murder of Jews in Europe.

Twenty-five years ago, when the building opened, noted Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel introduced the museum not as an answer to the horrors of genocide but to pose a glaring question: How could this happen?

The U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments Monday in Pereira v. Sessions, a case that, for thousands of immigrants, could mean the difference between staying in the country and being deported.

At the center of it all is a Brazilian immigrant who overstayed his visa and for almost 16 years has lived on Martha’s Vineyard.

‘What Could Happen? We Don’t Know’

Since long before anyone can remember, the big, fertile slopes of the Alazani Valley in eastern Georgia have been planted with grapevines. It's the heartland of winemaking in the country that invented it 8,000 years ago. But in recent months, the valley has been going through a new kind of ferment, because of bitcoin.

Here's the good news about Westworld 2.0: It's a little easier to follow than the first cycle.

That's a welcome development, because the debut season of HBO's sci-fi-infused drama about artificial people in the world's trippiest theme park seemed to twist itself in knots to keep viewers guessing. Worst of all, the effort didn't work: Many fans guessed the show's biggest plot twists weeks before they were revealed onscreen.

The first season ended more than a year ago, so here's a refresher before we get into Sunday's episode. (Yes, there are spoilers below.)

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